Blog 9 Evaluating Sources

 

* Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/10/21/after-alabama-immigration-law-few-americans-taking-immigrants-work_n_1023635.html

Is the information in this source accurate and trustworthy? How can you tell?

The website is liberal and only really shows information for continued appreciation of this side. I would not consider it a news source due to topics not being discussed from alternative viewpoints. However, the article itself seems to be credible, as stated below, and as such ought to be trustworthy and accurate.

Is the information in this source appropriate for an academic paper? Why or why not?

Due to the writers’ names being printed next to the AP symbol, I find this to be credible information because I find the Associated Press to be one of the most credible sources in the world. Because the information is credible, it is completely appropriate for an academic paper.

How well does the source address your topic and developing stance?

This is a good article for showing some background on how the new laws are affecting the farmers and the industry. It also shows how Americans react to new available jobs, and what farmers have had to do to stay afloat without cheap labor. It is a good start, and a good article to work with while researching this topic.

 

* Source: http://immigrationreform.com/2011/10/14/soviet-style-disinformation-in-alabama/.

Is the information in this source accurate and trustworthy? How can you tell?

I do not find this source to be accurate and trustworthy – the website and foundation seem to be one-sided and biased. The article, itself, started off with a sentence relating the former Soviet Union to the illegal alien advocacy in that it said that they were similar because they both use a disinformation tactic. An article essentially attacking one side is usually not credible.

            The article also discusses how the advocacy uses disinformation to spread things supposedly not true about the new immigration law. However, looking at the items the author listed as hyperbole, essentially, I can see some truth in them due to my previous experience. I met a friend in May who is Hispanic, American and living in Arizona. Since the law’s enactment, he has been stopped 19 times while driving alone, and asked for his papers. He has never been stopped while driving with his Caucasian wife in the passenger’s seat. Because this man was the head leader for a leadership retreat that I attended, I find him to be a much more credible source even despite his experience with a whole different state.

Is the information in this source appropriate for an academic paper? Why or why not?

I don’t find this source to be appropriate for an academic paper, so of course the information within is not appropriate either. This article seems to be more of a pissed off asshole writing about what’s currently shoving the stick up in there just a little bit further.

How well does the source address your topic and developing stance?

            The only way this article could possibly be helpful is if I just look at is as a display of how angry and worked up people can get about this issue. If this is going to affect my stance, I would naturally sway to be on the opposite side of this writer because he has a Republican feel and does not have credibility nor use credible sources, nor cite any information he has “collected.”

 

* Source: http://www.politifact.com/rhode-island/statements/2011/feb/06/terry-gorman/gorman-says-illegal-immigrants-cost-rhode-island-4/.

Is the information in this source accurate and trustworthy? How can you tell?

PolitiFact.com seems to be run by the St. Petersburg Times in Florida and as such seems to be a credible source of information since newspapers are supposed to be credible. I also took a look at the cited sources and they all seem to be credible as well. There are also links to places such as the US Census Bureau so that I can actually see the figures myself and compare to the article.

Is the information in this source appropriate for an academic paper? Why or why not?

This source seems to be attempting to debunk a statement made by providing numerous facts and figures. I feel that this is a good source to use, but more as a starting point. For example, find statistics in this source, but double check them and actually cite some other source, in text, such as the Census Bureau, and include both citations in the references.

How well does the source address your topic and developing stance?

This source throws a lot of different statistics at you. It seems to be a good place to see a lot of rebuttal information – it would also be a good idea to track the source of the quote this article is rebutting. It would be wise to make sure that the quote itself was not taken out of inappropriate context for this situation and issue.

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